The Tribe

This road trip is a moving human record, tragic, poignant, and humorous. A true account, which follows an attempt to cope with changing culture where everything is being short-circuited.

While appearing to be a simple tale there is hidden sophistication. It is a story of the first magnitude. The narrative swepts through history with camouflaged complexity. In places it is a dreadful miasama, filled with anger, bitterness and pain, from the physicist explanation of where humanity fits into the scheme of things, to the small Japanese child who ask repeatedly the strangers fleeing toward the River Plio after the bomb fell, “why is it dark again so early in the day.” Exploring the intersection between science, religion and culture, the reader is forced to think deeply as it interrupts the long communion of our own desires when we cannot refuse to accept some of its insights.

With candor the tale takes one through the five stages of grief moving back and forth in time in a no holds barred fashion, told by the very people who lived it. Brace yourself for their passage into trouble is brutal and stark. The tribe is the remnants of a long line (the long column) of English Knights. Their solutions melt into a gripping tale that flows like a river into the heart of every person who has a family for every family has a tribe around it. A special touch of this tour de force is the haunting undercurrent of a search for love among ruins.

P.S. The Tribe can be more fully understood as a part of a trilogy. The Life and Crimes of Bug Tussle is the second part. The trilogy was withdrawn in consideration for Angus Deatons after he was nominated for a Nobel prize for his work in economics.

--Joseph Deaton



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